TRAVEL: SCOTLAND: CUISINE: NOMAD DESTINATION GUIDE by Micaela Walker
Chanterelles found in a field. Gorgeous sautéed in butter and garlic. ©Micaela Walker; CLICK ON THE GOLD ARROW BELOW FOR THE NEXT SLIDE
TRAVEL: SCOTLAND: TRANSPORTATION: NOMAD DESTINATION GUIDE by Micaela Walker TRAVEL: SCOTLAND: STYLE: NOMAD DESTINATION GUIDE by Micaela Walker
  EATS:
I think this is true of most places - try to get the freshest food available. There is amazing seafood to be had in Scotland - salmon, oysters, mackerel, mussels, lobster, and crab. Also lamb, pheasant, pigeon, etc. Just ask what is free range and local and you are bound to have the best meal. And, of course, whiskey.

LUX:
The Kitchin Restaurant 
A modern, fresh take on Scottish fare inspired by local ingredients.
Being a vegetarian generally sucks in Scotland - there’s no other way to put it - but Tom Kitchin does actually have a vegetarian tasting menu as well as a stellar omnivore’s tasting menu.

LOCAL:
Forage. It’s all about foraging in Scotland. There are some great books about finding and cooking your own food called the River Cottage Handbooks. We have one called Edible Seashore
You can find all kinds of seaweeds and mushrooms, and various shelled creatures just hanging out at the waters edge waiting to be picked.
We put out crab and lobster pots off the Island of Neave or meet Billy, a local fisherman, at the harbor and pick from his lobsters. You can also order a sack of oysters from Mrs. Mackay who has an oyster farm in the Kyle of Tongue. She leaves them in a bag hanging off a pier.
We hike to an abandoned village called Slettle and pick mussels from the rocks, and fish in the North Sea for mackerel to smoke and pollock for fishcakes. Nothing tastes more amazing than a fish that was swimming in the ocean an hour before you ate it.
As for lowbrow foods you can get fish and chips almost anywhere. Scots love “curries” - Indian food - although I tend to think they’ve taken one of the healthiest most diverse cuisines in the world and made it greasy and processed. Still, after a night of drinking it’s not bad.
Lastly, try a bottle of Irn Bru. The Scots are obsessed with it, in part because it outsells Coca Cola there, the only country in the world that does so. I feel like enough has been said about Haggis so I’m going to leave that one alone.


Micaela Walker
2014